Scientists Warn of the Dangers of ‘Digital Overload’

cell-phone-data-largeAre you suffering from digital overload?

According to neuroscientists at the University of California, being bombarded with constant electronic stimuli is pushing our brains to work overtime (1).

Our attention is being divided and it’s causing stress levels to soar. Even more concerning, turning off devices does not stop the brain from over-reacting to stimuli.

Digital overload leads the brain to remain in a hyper alert and distracted state, even when the devices are turned off. It makes a person more sensitive to all incoming data from their environment (2).

It’s a new world, and even if you decided to get rid of the convenience of electronic devices, many people wouldn’t be able to make a living without them.

You don’t have to become a techno-hermit— but you would be wise to be aware of the effects that constant connectivity is having on you and your loved ones.

Do you become restless, agitated and bored as soon as there is no stimulus to amuse you? Are you constantly reaching for your ipad, smart phone or laptop in every spare moment?

Do you reach for your devices right after you wake and find that they are the last thing you put down at night?

Do you constantly multitask between devices, tabs and tasks, doing several things at once? These are just some of the symptoms of digital overload.

The good news is that you can turn this fragmented mind state around by relating to the technology in your life with an attitude of mindful awareness. Studies have shown that mindfulness counteracts the negative effects of digital overload.

I highly recommend that you learn how to practice mindfulness from a qualified teacher or even by reading a book or listening to a CD (It has many other benefits besides shielding your mind from digital overload).

If you’d like to learn some actions you can take right now to buffer yourself from digital overload, check out these ’7 Strategies to Maintain Mindfulness In the Information Age’

Please feel free to share your own wisdom or ask any questions in the comments section of the site. I’m here to help luvs.

Stay in touch!

Love Melli

1) http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/07/technology/07brain.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

2) http://agbeat.com/business-news/frequent-email-checkers-are-less-focused-and-productive/

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